06 / August
06 / August
The Sharknado Deniers

Halfway through Sharknado 2: The Second One, I glimpsed a tiger shark--indigenous to tropical waters quite unlike those encroaching upon New York City--attacking pedestrians in Manhattan. This bit of artistic license almost completely ruined it for me. Had the filmmakers done their homework they would have discovered that tiger sharks rarely navigate the Atlantic north of the 30th parallel--let alone north of the 40th parallel. Read my piece @ the American Spectator on how such inattention to detail will unfortunately unleash the sharknado deniers.

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03 / August
03 / August
Earth to Oakland: Mumia Is Not MLK

An Oakland AFL-CIO "union of unions" has resolved to pressure the local schools to teach a curriculum comparing the assassin Mumia Abu-Jamal with the assassinated Martin Luther King. Read my piece @ Breitbart on how Mumia is guilty of murder; his votaries, self-delusion.

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26 / July
26 / July
You're Under Arrest, Cardiac Arrest

Smoking is healthier than fascism. The aphorism's latest affirmation comes via the death of a seller of cigarette singles at the hands of New York City police officers. Read my column @ the American Spectator on how politicians passing petty laws--such as prohibitions on selling loose cigarettes rather than packs--ultimately leads to disrespect for law enforcers.

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25 / July
25 / July
Pulp Fiction for a Digital Age

Conservatives' discovery of Liberty Island comes at a good time. The online publisher of "right brain" fiction embraces conservatism in the best sense; not a series of policy prescriptions but a preservation of that worth keeping. Read my piece @ the American Spectator on the return of pulp fiction for a digital age.

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11 / July
11 / July
Falling Asleep to Pink Floyd

Pink Floyd announced an October release for their first album in twenty years. I party to "Brown Sugar" and work out to "Baba O'Riley." I dream to "Echoes" and "Sheep." Read my article @ the American Spectator on why Pink Floyd puts me to sleep.

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01 / July
01 / July
The Lazy Machines Kill Literacy

My public library leaves hundreds of titles--including the "great books"--for the taking on a bookshelf atop wheels in the lobby. I picked up Walker Percy's Lancelot, which I promptly read, and Rob Sheffield's enjoyable Talking to Girls About Duran Duran, which I had read four years ago. Free books at once read as blessing and curse. I value a good read. But when a library gives away a good read they confirm that the public by and large doesn't value a good read. Give a good read to my article @ the American Spectator on how the lazy machines have killed literacy.

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26 / June
26 / June
Ties Are for Losers

The thrill of victory. The agony of defeat. The numbness of a draw. Who prefers anesthetization to stimulation? Roughly one of every six 2014 World Cup matches has ended in a draw. It's the soccer way. It's not the American way. Read my piece @ Breitbart Sports on why a nation that came from too-certain Puritans and Cowboys not high on nuance detest draws.

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24 / June
24 / June
Jack White, Black Wax, and the Triumph of Quality over Efficiency

Jack White owns the top spot on the Billboard albums chart in large part because of the sale of vinyl albums. White's "Lazaretto" sold more vinyl LPs in one week than any other act in the 23-year history of SoundScan. Consumers rejected new technology for old here because older, in this case, means better. Just as a landline operates as a more superior telephone than an iPhone, vinyl records sound better than compressed, tinny, digital music. They're not as convenient as digital, just as your landline can't take a picture like your iPhone. But if it's purely about the music, records sound better. Read my column @ the American Spectator on how the latest isn't always the greatest.

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16 / June
16 / June
We Aren't the World: Why America Resists Soccer Imperialism

Demonstrative enthusiasm for European football stands as a popular passive-aggressive way that Americans announce their superiority vis-a-vis the rubes next door. Like smallpox, Nazism, and Cliff Richard, soccer is something that Europeans should have kept to themselves. Read my piece @ Breitbart Sports on how it's okay for Americans to play soccer--it's just not okay for them to play a European.

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13 / June
13 / June
Long Live the People's Poet

Rik Mayall died this week. The uninitiated get a sense of Mayall’s humor by reading his autobiography, or at least the title: Bigger than Hitler, Better than Christ. But anyone growing up in the 1980s likely knew him as that left-wing poseur "Rick" in The Young Ones. Read my article @ the American Spectator on how Rik's death leaves me feeling that we may not be the young ones very long.

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09 / June
09 / June
Live and Let Live, Not Live and Let Murder Me

When symbols on the "coexist" bumpersticker come to represent people who would rather you not exist, then it's time to rethink koexistieren, coesistere, and coexistir. The word, in any tongue, implies live and let live--not live and let murder me. Read my piece @ the American Spectator on how Europe finds Islamic immigration so vexing because it doesn't know what it's supposed to be defending in response to the challenge of Europe's values.

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30 / May
30 / May
Dead Poets Society

Dr. Maya Angelou, an author more revered than read, passed away at 86 on Wednesday. She is survived by her seven autobiographies. Read my column @ the American Spectator on how the doctor without a doctorate lived the American Dream whose existence she sometimes doubted.

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23 / May
23 / May
Who Breaks a Butterfly Upon a Wheel?

Dinesh D'Souza gave away his money to a political candidate. Now the state wants to take his freedom away. It's the law and not the lawbreaker that commits the crime here. Read my column @ the American Spectator on the attempt to lock up Dinesh D'Souza with mother-rapers, father-stabbers, father-rapers, and those guys on To Catch a Predator.

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16 / May
16 / May
Know-Nothing Know-It-Alls

Commencement ceremonies now serve as an exclamation point to the horrible education received by students. Too ignorant to know that they don't know, graduating activists regard successful attempts to block speakers as triumphs instead of reflections on their failures to learn. Read my article @ the American Spectator on campus Jacobins pulling the plug on graduation speakers at Haverford, Smith, Brandeis, and points beyond.

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12 / May
12 / May
Liberating Tolerance's Long March

America isn't as free as it used to be. The attitudinal evolution on speech has occurred in the last few years. The seeds of the transformation were planted several decades ago on America's campuses. Facing off with book burners, mobs shouting down my words, and bureaucrats pulling the plug on my talks, I can't say I didn't see the wider, societal censorship coming. So the heckler's veto preventing Condi Rice from speaking at Rutgers or the impuritans demanding HGTV pull a reality show off the air because of its stars' Christianity doesn't seem so surreal to me. Read my piece @ the American Spectator on the Left's Long March from Herbert Marcuse's "liberating tolerance" to cancelled television shows and speakers followed so predictable a path that current surprise should surprise.

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